We have helped 1000's of people over the last 10 years. We can help you too!

Would you like to subscribe to our blog?

Blog Opt-In 01: Top (Horizontal)

Blog Opt-In 01: Top (Horizontal)

Sending

Blog Opt-In 01: Top (Vertical)

Blog Opt-In 01: Top (Vertical)

Geolocation (Hidden Fields)

Sending

I give permission to receive weekly articles and other information from Emotion Academy

Stop Overthinking Everything!

We face problems everyday; small things like “What if I’m late for work?” “Can I have a  burger for lunch today, or should I stick to a salad?”, but we also face more prominent issues like “What if I don’t like my new job?” or “What if I don’t have enough money for bills?”.

There is uncertainty in life all the time. Things are changing and you’re not always going to be sure what will happen next. This can cause stress, frustration, and fear of the future in some people.

There are some people who face uncertainty and aren’t fazed by it: they accept it, face it, and move on. Some people, on the other hand, don’t handle it so well. Whilst we aren’t always able to change the outcome of certain situations, we can control our response to it. It starts with understanding ourselves and becoming more aware of the way we feel, as well as the way we respond to these emotions.

Our mind stores thoughts and memories like pictures; if you close your eyes and think about the colour of the shirt you’re wearing, for example, you’re quickly creating an image of the top’s colour in your mind, faster than you may even recognise.

Thinking is great! Overthinking can be a problem.

People who tend to overthink, stress, and over-analyse, are often creating images in their mind for every thought they have. The issue is that some of these images will conflict with others, or the person will associate them with negativity.

lisa-sidebar-2

Would you like to subscribe to our blog?

Blog Opt-In 02: Middle & Bottom

Blog Opt-In 02: Middle & Bottom

Geolocation (Hidden Fields)

Sending

Get 3 Months Free Training. Limited Time Only!

One of the problems with overthinking is that the mind comes up with several images at once, and it’s not sure which one to prioritise or process first. The complex images become overwhelming and can lead to stress.

When I was younger I auditioned for a place in a theater program in university. I was standing outside, worried; I didn’t know who would be inside or what to expect when I walked through the doors. I was worried about whether I would remember my lines, how many people would be in the room, what other people would be like: the list went on and on. I was scared, almost in tears, and overwhelmed by fear.

My dad was with me and said that I could leave, or I could go inside. He also reminded me how much time I had taken to prepare for this audition and suggested I might as well go for it. After all, I could leave at any time. He then asked me, if I did leave now, would I regret it tomorrow?

Do you want help with Sadness, Procrastination, Self-Sabotage, Confidence or Motivation?

Perspective Is Key!

Something in this chat from my dad helped me get a clearer perspective, and go from creating so many different ideas of what might or might not happen after I walked through those doors, all with unknown possibilities, to just one single image at a time.

Step one was walking through the door and sitting in the theater. So I took a deep breath, went inside and had a seat in the theater. I noticed that I wasn’t the only one sitting quietly that other people looked as nervous as I was. The next step was to focus on the preparation I had done. There were three separate parts to the audition, and I had prepared for each of them. When my name was called out, I stood up, walked on stage, moved into position and started.

At one point I forgot my line and I couldn’t focus on anything else. I asked for the line and continued. I completed the audition. I surprised myself in one really stressful moment by focusing on what I was in control of. I couldn’t control what other people thought of me, so I decided not to worry about it, and returned my focus to the next part of the audition.

I got through it by focussing on how I could control my responses by paying attention to the the small certainties:  walking through the door, on the preparation I had done, and doing my best. When I left the audition the result was out of my hands. Thinking, overthinking, analysing and dwelling on how well I thought I had done or hadn’t done, wouldn’t influence my chance of acceptance.

What people are saying about Emotion Academy:

"After many years of training, courses, and counselling in various forms I thought I had certain aspects of my life sorted. Yet completing Emotion Academy showed me that I had been running away from my emotions and not facing them. After Emotion Academy, now I have the tools to engage with myself and win the internal battles once and for all - Neil Welsh, Victoria

I’ve used this experience to develop the following strategies that makes it easier to get through, the steps are the same whether it’s a big challenge or small.

1. Breathe

When we’re stressed, we often have shallow breathing, so I remember to take a few deep breaths. The great thing about taking deep breaths is that we pause for a time and shrink our focus to that moment; thereby giving us the opportunity to consider our next step; to pause before continuing.

2. Focus on the best case scenario

Use the pictures you create in your mind to your advantage! Work out what is the best case scenario of any situation and focus on that. Create a picture or a short movie and hold that in the forefront of your mind. For example, if your task is meeting new people, create a picture of yourself talking to someone new. You can’t control their response; however, you can create a mini movie to help you remain calm while you talk to the person. Of remaining confident and composed. You can imagine that you find the right things to say and if you get stuck, of quicking getting back on track. You may surprise yourself at how well you do after completing this step first.

3. Take Action

Preparation is important; but so is action. People who overthink sometimes think so much about a situation or task that it can prevent them from getting started. They want all the information first in an attempt to get something perfect from the beginning. If you keep the preparation simple, then you’ll be able to take action as soon as possible. When I went to the audition, knowing I’d done what I could to prepare, the next step taking action and walking through the door.

4. Celebrate

There are times when you might feel uncomfortable doing new things – like walking through the doors to an audition. What can help make these situations easier, is remembering to celebrating the little steps along the way. You should feel good for completing the first step, give yourself a pat on the back. Then do the same for the next step and the one after that. People forget how far they’ve come if they don’t take a moment to enjoy their achievements along the way.

12189775_971454386226002_8968310333194739900_n

Melisa Grigg - Head Coach & Trainer

Melisa was stuck in sadness for 15 years, hated her job, was overweight and her relationship had just ended. Melisa inspires people with her story and now teaches how she sorted her life out. She worked out how to be happy and how to lose over 30kg of body weight.  In simple steps she teaches how you can stop procrastinating, find confidence, stop being so sad and finally start to find true meaning and purpose in your life.

Once you’ve faced a challenge; meeting someone new, having a tough conversation, travelling to a foreign country for the first time, going on job interviews, and so on, celebrate having completed it. I like to celebrate with a dance, I play music, and cheer with my hands in the air, or give myself a mental high five.

5. Utilise Environment

Environment is what I call the friends and family I interact with on a regular basis. Environment refers to the people around me. When it comes to doing something new or challenging, ask yourself if there is anyone you know who has been in the same situation. Did they get through it? Could you ask them what they did to overcome the challenge?
And if the answer is no, is there a way you could find someone who has been there before? Learning from others is so valuable because their insight is from concrete experiences.

If you are going for a job interview and you are uncertain about whether you will be able to do the job, find someone who is already working in that role, and ask them questions about it. Make certainty out of your uncertainty.

Remember, you may not get it perfect right away. Like a child learning to walk though, it’ll get easier as time goes on. Take control, choose your response, and remember to celebrate the moments along the way!

lisa-sidebar-2

Would you like to subscribe to our blog?

Blog Opt-In 02: Middle & Bottom

Blog Opt-In 02: Middle & Bottom

Geolocation (Hidden Fields)

Sending

Get 3 Months Free Training. Limited Time Only!